Top 13 Best Gaming Mouse for Small Hands in Canada

The greatest gaming mouse provides you with the most direct input into the gameworld. It’s your eyes and your irritated trigger finger. And if you want to be at the top of your game, you’ll want to invest in the most responsive, accurate gaming mouse money can buy.

However, there are numerous alternatives. Do you play MMOs with a lot of hotkeys and require a lot of extra buttons? Do you find wires to be vexing? Are you looking for a super lightweight mouse for competitive gaming? Whatever your requirements are, there is almost certainly a gaming mouse that will meet them.

We examined dozens of gaming mice of all shapes and sizes and reduced them down to a few that stood out from the crowd. One thing you’ll notice is that the best gaming mouse doesn’t have to cost you $200; there are a handful of terrific budget alternatives on the list that cost less than $50.

Why should I choose a gaming mouse over the average optical mouse?

For starters, gaming mouse sensors are intended to be more responsive and accurate. Your goal will remain accurate with configurable (or no) smoothing and acceleration. Gaming mice are also meant to have more accessible, customizable buttons than standard mice, so you won’t have to fumble around with your keyboard while you’re on a kill streak.

Is a wireless mouse OK for gaming?

Historically, the answer was always a resounding no. The wireless connection, while convenient, added extra delay to the connection when compared to a conventional cable, which meant input lag in games was a ‘thing.’ In competitive online games, this is also seen as a “very bad thing.”

However, current wireless interfaces, particularly 2.4GHz radio connections, have no discernible latency difference when compared to a typical cable connection. Blind testing with pro gamers using wired and wireless mice have been conducted, and if the most sensitive players can’t tell the difference, we’re convinced you won’t be able to either.

Bluetooth connections, on the other hand, can still introduce unwanted input lag into a gaming setting, thus they should be avoided. Bluetooth, on the other hand, is only used as a low-power backup option in a modern wireless gaming mouse.

What should I look out for in a gaming mouse?

When choosing a mouse, your first goal should be to choose one that is comfortable in your hand. There are numerous sizes, shapes, and weights to think about. You can have the coolest-looking mouse with the most functional array of buttons in the world, but if it’s not comfortable for you, you won’t be able to use it. If a funny stance is more your style, there are plenty of ambidextrous gaming mice and gaming mice for lefties on the list.

Most gaming mice have also adopted very high DPI sensors (or, more precisely, CPI) in recent years, so even a low-cost mouse will likely perform well. Most of these sensors can handle incredibly high DPI counts of up to 20,000 DPI, but in reality, you’ll be playing at a much lower sensitivity—generally under 2,000 DPI. The general view is that you shouldn’t be too concerned about that figure. Instead, focus on picking a mouse with the perfect shape and weight, as well as one that will complement your aesthetic setup.

Pro gamers typically advocate lighter, simpler mice with fewer buttons to get in the way. Lighter mice are less tiring on your wrist and can glide across the mouse pad at fast speeds. Anything less than 100 grams is frequently suitable for competitive mice. But there’s something to be said for how strong you feel at the helm of a nice weighty mouse.

How do we test gaming mice?

We’ve tried enough gaming mouse to get a sense of the build quality, button placement, and shape. Our perspectives on mouse design are inevitably subjective, but they are also well-informed. The difficult element of testing gaming mice is establishing how each of these factors affects the experience of using a mouse: tracking performance, jitter, angle snapping, acceleration, and optimal control speed.

We’ve used enough gaming mice to have a feel for the build quality, button placement, and shape. Our opinions on mouse design are, of course, subjective, but they are also well-informed. The most difficult aspect of testing gaming mice is determining how each of the following factors influences the user experience: tracking performance, jitter, angle snapping, acceleration, and optimal control speed.

Grip- refers to the manner in which you hold the mouse. Palm, claw, and fingertip grips are the most prevalent. Here’s an illustration of how each grip works.

CPI- is an abbreviation for counts per inch, or how many times the mouse sensor will read its tracking surface, namely your mousepad, for every inch it moves. The word DPI is widely used, although CPI is a more precise term. The lower the CPI, the farther the mouse must be moved to move the cursor on the screen.

Jitter is the inaccuracy with which a mouse sensor reads the surface it is tracking. Jitter is more common at faster mouse movement speeds or higher CPIs. Jitter can cause your cursor to move about wildly, and even minor jitter can ruin a shot in an FPS or cause you to miskick on a unit in an RTS.

Angle Snapping- Takes input from a mouse sensor and adjusts the output to make smoother motions, also known as a prediction. For example, if you try to draw a horizontal line with your mouse, you’ll see some tiny curves in the line, especially at higher sensitivity. Angle snapping smoothes out the curves and replaces them with a straight line. This is generally problematic because your mouse motions will not match your hand movements 1:1, and angle snapping will be useless in most games. Fortunately, angle snapping is disabled by default on practically all gaming mouse.

Acceleration is likely the most loathed and analyzed aspect of gaming mouse sensors. When a mouse sensor exhibits acceleration, your cursor will move faster the faster you move the mouse; this is frequently regarded as undesirable because moving the mouse slowly six inches across a mousepad will move the pointer differently from moving the mouse swiftly the same distance. This introduces variability, which might be difficult to forecast.

The perfect control speed, also known as the malfunction rate, is the fastest speed at which the mouse may be moved while still tracking perfectly. Most gaming mice track quite effectively when moved at medium speeds, yet low CPI players frequently move their mice across mousepads at rapid speeds. Not all mouse sensors can maintain tracking accuracy at high speeds, particularly at high CPIs. The point at which the sensors stop tracking accurately varies depending on the CPI level.

IPS measures inches per second and also rates the effective maximum tracking speed of any specific sensor. Not to be mistaken with the same-named gaming display panel type, the greater the IPS of any given mouse, the better it can keep up with fast movement while maintaining accuracy.

Lift-off distance is still a popular statistic among mouse enthusiasts, despite the fact that it has no bearing on the majority of gamers. LOD is the height at which a mouse must be elevated before the sensor stops tracking its surface. Some gamers choose a mouse with a very short lift-off distance because they play at a low sensitivity level and frequently have to raise their mouse off the pad to “reset” it is a place where they can continue swiping. When the mouse is lifted with a low LOD, the cursor does not travel wildly.

List of 13 Best Gaming Mouse for Small Hands in Canada

1. Razer Deathadder V2

Gaming Mouse

The Razer Deathadder has a terrific form for all grips and hand sizes, and I’ve spent hundreds of hours with it playing games, using Photoshop, and browsing the Internet. Despite years of modifications, Razer never changes the form of the Deathadder. There isn’t any reason to.

The Deathadder V2 employs a 20,000 DPI Razer Focus+ optical sensor, and while huge numbers don’t always imply excellence, they do in this case. Razer’s latest technology provides faultless tracking even when you move the mouse as quickly as humanly feasible.

The Deathadder V2 is an excellent mouse for the vast majority of games and gamers. Its design is straightforward, with two well-placed, substantially sized thumb buttons. It also boasts an amazing optical mouse sensor that works on both hard and soft pads, as well as the ideal body form for a claw or hybrid claw/palm grip.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 20,000

Sensor: Optical

Interface: USB

Buttons: 6

Ergonomic: Right-handed

Weight: 82 g (2.9 oz)

Battery life: N/A

Pros

  • One of the best sensors available
  • Ideal shape for palm or claw grips 
  • Supports a variety of hand sizes

Cons

  • Buttons on the flimsy side

2. Logitech G203 Lightsync

There are many budget gaming mouse worth your money on the market today, but few have the same level of trustworthiness as the Logitech G203 Light sync. It’s an all-around performer, giving a solid and consistent performance in a sleek compact, and is without a doubt the best affordable gaming mouse on the market today. If you’re interested, the Logitech sensor inside is rated up to 8,000 DPI, and it has sensitive switches throughout to ensure smooth operation.

The only noticeable difference between this and the G203 Prodigy that used to sit here is that the Light sync has three-zone RGB lighting instead of the Prodigy’s single-zone lighting. It’s not a significant improvement, but it looks great and, in theory, doesn’t cost anything extra. If you can find a good offer on the G203 Prodigy, we strongly advise you to take advantage of it while supplies last.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 8,000

Sensor: Optical

Interface: USB

Buttons: 5

Ergonomic: Right-handed

Weight: 85 g (3.0 oz)

Battery life: N/A

Pros

  • An affordable bargain
  • Great shape for those who like smaller mice
  • Three-zone RGB lighting

Cons

  • Feature-light
  • Less DPI granularity

3. Razer Naga Pro

Razer’s Naga mouse has come a long way in terms of both form and function over the years, but it has long been considered the best MMO mouse for the money. And the latest version of the Razer Naga Pro is the greatest yet: a tiny, ergonomic mouse with a high-quality sensor and three configurable thumb grips, as well as button arrays suitable for MOBAs, MMOs, or general use.

The MOBA array is the greatest; it has 6 buttons laid out in two rows, allowing for enough buttons to map various skills while not becoming an overpowering samey blob.

This year’s Naga has a longer battery life and is compatible with the Razer Mouse Dock (not included, sadly). The Razer Naga Pro is a bit small for larger palms, with a more squat form than a typical gaming mouse. It’s comfortable in the relaxed grip that’s ideal for MMOs, but it’ll also work in MOBAs, shooters, and other busy games.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 20,000

Sensor: Razer Focus+ optical sensor

Interface: Wireless, USB, Bluetooth

Buttons: 3 swappable side plates with up to 19+1 programmable buttons

Ergonomic: Right-handed

Weight: 117 g (4.1 oz)

Battery life: 150Hrs

Pros

  • Customizable thumb grip with three different button arrays
  • Razer mouse charging Dock Chroma Compatible

Cons

  • Chunky and heavy

4. SteelSeries Prime Wireless

The Prime Wireless is a no-frills, high-performance gadget designed to blend into your palm and transform you into the FPS god you’ve always wanted to be. The $139 mouse is part of Steelseries’ Prime line of esports peripherals, and it lies between the less expensive wired Prime and the OLED-equipped Prime+.

The Prime Wireless immediately felt like it was made exactly for my hand. SteelSeries claims to have collaborated with multiple esports players to create the perfect shape and weight that feels like an extension of your arm. For the first time, the product lives up to the hype. The Prime Wireless is intended for right-handed users, specifically claw and fingertip grippers. The entire mouse appears to softly slope to the right, cradling in your palm for a comfortable grasp.

It features a built-in rechargeable battery that is rated for 100 hours per charge, which is more than a week of regular use. However, I should tell out that those figures are only possible when the mouse is in High-efficiency mode, which reduces several parameters, such as the RGB, to save power. For gaming, keep it in performance mode, which will consume the battery in far less time—around 40 hours in testing.

I never expected to like the Steelseries Prime Wireless, yet it’s incredibly pleasant to use for both work and gaming. Input lag is not an issue, and wireless devices are practically indistinguishable from their cable counterparts these days. The battery life is excellent, and the quick charging feature is something that every wireless peripheral should have. The Prime Wireless is on the pricey side at $139, but it’s a high-quality mouse that will serve you well.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 18,000

Sensor: TrueMove Pro

Interface: Quantum Wireless 2.0 + USB Type-C

Buttons: 6

Ergonomic: Right-handed

Weight: 80 g (2.82 oz)

Battery life: 100Hrs + quick charge

Pros

  • Excellent feel
  • Rock-solid wireless 
  • Great battery life with quick charge

Cons

  • Dull aesthetics
  • CPI switch is on the bottom
  • Non-standard USB Type-C charging cable

5. Corsair Ironclaw RGB

The Ironclaw is the best mouse for gamers with larger hands that we’ve tested. While its design incorporates an unusual mix of materials, from smooth matte plastic on the buttons to the diamond pattern, grippy rubber sides, and the odd, wavy rubber on the scroll wheel, each performs well.

Instead of a single cohesive material, Corsair has chosen one for each panel individually, which contributes to the mouse’s superb overall fit and makes it feel incredibly snug sliding over your mouse pad. It’s domed and curved to fit precisely in the palm of right-handed gamers’ hands, and it’s one of the most comfortable mouse I’ve ever used.

It does feel a little heavy, especially for a wireless mouse, and it doesn’t have adjustable weights. While this means the Ironclaw is slightly heavier than other, lighter wired mice.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 18,000

Sensor: Optical

Interface: USB

Buttons: 7

Ergonomic: Right-handed

Weight: 105 g (3.7 oz)

Battery life: N/A

Pros

  • Great, comfortable fit for larger hands
  • Highly responsive with tactile buttons

Cons

  • Cumbersome
  • Doesn’t support customizable weights

6. SteelSeries Sensei 310

The Sensei 310, an improved version of this Steelseries favorite, discreetly redesigned a traditional mouse. It was required. Except for the Sensei’s ambidextrous shape, almost else is new, and that’s precisely how it should be. The Sensei is now more grippable and can withstand a sweaty palm thanks to a redesigned plastic cover. Steelseries employs its own bespoke version of one of the greatest gaming sensors available, assuring that the Sensei 310 has no tracking difficulties.

The Sensei 310 is a fantastic shape for either left- or right-handed gamers seeking a midsized ambidextrous mouse, and it fits in your hand much like the old Sensei. That means it has identical thumb buttons on both the left and right sides, which is a common issue with ambidextrous mice—far it’s too simple to mistakenly touch the wrong side’s buttons when you grasp with your pinky. That hasn’t happened once in my hours of trying the Sensei 310.

The size and form of the thumb buttons have been changed to make it easier to press them by rocking your thumb upwards while keeping them out of the way of inadvertent pinky clicks. Anyone looking for a compact, light, or ambidextrous mouse should start here.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 12,000

Sensor: Optical

Interface: USB

Buttons: 8

Ergonomic: Ambidextrous

Weight: 92 g (3.2 oz)

Battery life: N/A

Pros

  • Very light at 92 grams
  • Great shape with improved grips and materials

Cons

  • Non-braided cable
  • Software isn’t the easiest to use

7. Logitech G Pro Wireless

When it comes to cord-free pointers, the G Pro Wireless is unrivaled, packing Logitech’s outstanding 16,000 DPI HERO sensor and the kind of latency-free experience you’d expect from a cabled mouse. It’s exceedingly light, weighing a little over 80g, but it doesn’t seem cheap or throwaway, as some lighter mice do. Instead, it is made of high-quality materials and performs admirably.

Logitech made every component in the G Pro Wireless as light and sturdy as possible, including reducing the thickness of the chassis’ side walls without losing composition or density. The G Pro has survived many severe tumbles off my desk; it’s a really strong piece of gear.

It also has a long battery life of 40 hours and is adjustable, having buttons on the side panels that can be removed and replaced with smooth inserts if that’s your taste. You may also use the G Pro in conjunction with Logitech’s Powerplay charging mat to ensure that you never run out of power. The only major drawback is the price: at roughly $120, the G Pro isn’t cheap, but it more than makes up for it in terms of quality.

SPECIFICATIONS

DPI: 16,000

Sensor: Optical HERO 16K

Interface: Wireless and USB

Buttons: 8

Ergonomic: Ambidextrous

Weight: 81 g (2.9 oz)

Battery life: 40Hrs

Pros

  • Swappable components
  • Excellent design
  • Extremely light

Cons

  • Proprietary USB charging cable

8. Logitech G502 Lightspeed

If you can stomach the price tag, the Logitech G502 Lightspeed is a terrific weapon for your arsenal. It’s a lighter and wireless version of the renowned Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum. The G502 Lightspeed begins to repay your investment with premium features such as six different weights (two 4g and four 2g) for changing the mouse’s feel.

The G502 Lightspeed is suitable for any gaming genre, thanks to Logitech’s high-CPI and power-efficient Hero sensor and an abundance of configurable buttons. Its shape is recognizable and comfy, and it is designed in the first-person shooter approach. When you don’t want to risk a wireless connection, the G502 Lightspeed comes with a dependable cable.

In addition to connecting to your PC through a wireless dongle, you may configure the G502 Lightspeed such that you never have to connect it to a cable at all, not even for charging. As long as the Logitech G Powerplay wireless charging mouse pad is hooked into a USB port, the mouse is always charging. Unfortunately, the mouse pad, which is now $120, prevents you from using either of the G502 Lightspeed’s 4g weights.

Consider Qi charging mice, such as the Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro SE, if you want a mouse that can charge wirelessly with a larger range of mouse pads (and more).

SPECIFICATIONS

Sensor: Logitech Hero 16K

CPI: 16,000

IPS: >400

Acceleration: > 40g

Interface: USB Type-A dongle or wired

Ergonomics: Right-handed

Programmable Buttons: 11

Weight: 4.02-4.59 ounces (114-130g)

Dimensions (LxWxH): 5.20 x 2.95 x 1.57 inches (132 x 75 x 40mm)

Pros

  • Great design
  • Wireless charging capability
  • Optional weight adjustment
  • Weighs less than the original

Cons

  • Powerplay gets in the way of weight adjustment
  • Expensive

9. Corsair Katar Pro XT

The Corsair Katar Pro XT is the best gaming mouse for you if you want a well-specced, comfortable gaming mouse at an inexpensive price. With a weight of only 2.68 ounces, this is a lightweight mouse that is ideal for long gaming sessions and is easy to adjust. Despite its low profile, this affordable mouse boasts a lovely, ambidextrous-shaped casing that doesn’t feel cheap. Corsair’s mouse, aimed at FPS and MOBA players, glides easily and without cable, drag owing to PTFE feet and a paracord USB-Type-A tether.

In terms of tethering, the wireless version of this mouse, the Corsair Katar Pro Wireless, can be obtained for only a little more, if not the same price, as this wired version. That is something to think about. Save even more weight if you’re looking for the lightest mouse, something with a honeycomb shell, like the Glorious mice on this page.

The Katar Pro XT isn’t the most flashy or distinctive mouse on the market, but it’s a solid gaming partner.

SPECIFICATIONS

Sensor: Pixart PMW3391

DPI: 18,000

IPS: 400

Acceleration: 50g

Interface: USB Type-A

Ergonomics: Right-handed, claw, fingertip

Programmable Buttons: 6

Weight: 2.68 ounces (73g)

Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.56 x 2.53 x 1.49 inches (115.8 x 64.2 x 37.8mm)

Pros

  • Comfortable, familiar design
  • Feels light, without honeycomb holes

Cons

  • Wireless model costs just a few dollars more
  • Not as light as some pricier alternatives

10. Glorious Model D

If you play first-person shooter games, a lightweight mouse can significantly improve your experience, making you never want to use a “regular” mouse again. The Glorious Model D- (available for $50 here or at Microcenter) is the greatest gaming mouse for FPS titles because to its extremely lightweight of 2.15 ounces and comfortable form that will fit righties with a palm or claw grip, as well as smaller hands.

Glorious’ Model D- is a great example of the honeycomb-style mouse that we’ve been seeing a lot lately. If you can get beyond the dubious Glorious branding, you’ll get a mouse that’s easy to push and glides almost smoothly on its high-quality PTFE feet.

If you want something more ambidextrous, the HK Gaming MIra-M or Glorious Model O- (both available on this page) may be a better fit. The Model D-, on the other hand, is an A+ choice for a quality mouse that can help you change the way you play.

Oh, and if you’re worried about keeping it clean or dealing with all those holes, Glorious CEO Shazim Mohammad has some advice for you.

SPECIFICATIONS

Sensor: Pixart PMW3360

DPI: 12,000

IPS: 250-plus

Acceleration: 50g

Interface: USB Type-A

Ergonomics: Right-handed palm, claw grip or smaller hands

Programmable Buttons: 6

Weight: 2.15 ounces (61g)

Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.72 x 2.40-2.64 x 1.30-1.57 inches (120 x 61-67 x 33-40mm)

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Excellent sensor and switches

Cons

  • Some button wobble
  • Not for lefties

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